Radar’s first (and second).

Radar’s first (and second).

"Goodbye, Radar."

"Goodbye, Radar."

Every early episode of M*A*S*H starts by pushing into Radar’s POV of the helicopters coming. Radar is also often strangely prescient about the arrival of the helicopters, and the needs of his commanding officers. In an early episode he states that he is going to write a book about his experiences, and that is what we are seeing in the whole of M*A*S*H. Radar is recalling and encoding in single serving story form, the emotions and characters of those he met during his time in the war. In episode 7x02, we begin to see Radar get so enveloped in his character’s stories that he loses control of the environment and does not sense the choppers before they come. He will remove himself completely in the eighth season, giving the story over to those around him. In the remaining seasons, the credits start already pushed in on the helicopters, showing that the story can now run without the guide of the teller.

Every early episode of M*A*S*H starts by pushing into Radar’s POV of the helicopters coming. Radar is also often strangely prescient about the arrival of the helicopters, and the needs of his commanding officers. In an early episode he states that he is going to write a book about his experiences, and that is what we are seeing in the whole of M*A*S*H. Radar is recalling and encoding in single serving story form, the emotions and characters of those he met during his time in the war. In episode 7x02, we begin to see Radar get so enveloped in his character’s stories that he loses control of the environment and does not sense the choppers before they come. He will remove himself completely in the eighth season, giving the story over to those around him. In the remaining seasons, the credits start already pushed in on the helicopters, showing that the story can now run without the guide of the teller.

"My folks never took their clothes off, sir. They said that the skin was the devil’s slip cover."

"My folks never took their clothes off, sir. They said that the skin was the devil’s slip cover."